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20121104
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but really not that big. sandra: in the energy complex, refinery closures along the coast because of this storm. we saw oil prices go down and rbob gasoline prices went up. >> those things typically a a lot of times are pretty much -- imagination is your own worst enemy. we will have to see how those things really play out in the future. i don't think it's going to be that big of an impact. i think the market would have told us a lot more if there was going to be something big. sandra: what are you and your colleagues expecting for tomorrow? are you going to show up in the morning? the cme has not said whether the markets will be closed. >> we will be here for the grain markets. the fixed income might be different, that could be a ballroom with nobody there, but right now we will have a full staff and see what the exchange tells us. sandra: how do you position yourself in the global marketplace where traders can't anticipate whether or not the markets will be opened or closed? what do you do? stock market we already know is going to be closed. >> we don't have a choice. we have to
. they have lots of energy. why do you like technology right now? >> not just in the consumer, not in the mobile phones, but technology is one of those trends that affects every industry. it affects healthcare. it affects energy. energy we saw the new natural gas fracking that's bringing enormous supplies to the market. we could be energy independent because of the technology applied to energy. liz: yet you don't like energy, you say avoid energy. >> who is the biggest beneficiary of this new supply is really the consumers, and the businesses have low cost gas, natural gas has plummeted in price, so that actually hurts in an ironic way the producers of energy, benefits the consumers of energy. liz: that's why we have doug here to kind of help our brains go through the scenario of why energy and technology are on opposite ends at least for his preference. closing bell ringing in 50 minutes. is it time to cut the cord to your traditional cable box? i know some of you have already done that. but there are those of you who are sitting on the fence or the cable box so to speak and
beautifully. standing next to south cross energy up battle point* 5%. they did well even though hurricane sandy blooms on the eastern seaboard. liz: day do not sell hardware. they sell pretty stuff. [laughter] lasalle whole crew knows, the devastation from hurricane zandi -- sandy is felt that these coast with the energy side then the human side. we have lived team coverage 40 miles from and had an atom we will start with you. >> behind me receive the national guard and passing a water but also red cross now showing up but the field of dreams foundation and they showed up early on their own volunteers bringing food and clothing. diapers, betting common medications, food if you can cook or pizzas if you cannot. people are coming out with converters for govett is what is going on in staten island. those who are still waiting for the sanitation trucks they are furious the new york city marathon will be run. and assemblywoman says the governor should take the lead and another one said the mayor should get his stuff together. they're waiting for assistance. liz: is that the translation and you
the department of energy. connecticut 626,000 without electricity. new jersey, 2.5 million without electricity. new york, 1.9, roughly 2 million without electricity. pennsylvania, 1.2, 1.3 million without electricity. it is a huge number. in all, 18 states, are reporting that they have power outages. that total 8.1 million customers who don't have electricity. liz? liz: well, you know what? it doesn't surprise me that it is new jersey where president obama will go first. he is heading there tomorrow. just announced it at the top of the hour. he will be touring the area. adam, we saw the ariel pictures of -- aerial pictures of atlantic city i would imagine that or the area in queens where 80 homes were destroyed by fire would be the first places. of course queens in new york but maybe that's his second spot. adam: it sounds like he would go over to the rock aways where the homes burned. when you talk about the president coming here, one of the things people will be asking him and the department of energy is they have 25,000 men and women who are mobilized or being flown in from mexico and canad
of physical energy, it was so fast and widespread that the ultimate impact was less modest and if it had been a cat four or five storm. unlike in florida, you do not have entire towns missing their roofs. you generally end up having claims, which, you know, you look at the damage and say it must be astronomical. it will modestly be more reasonable. homes have been damage as opposed to being completely destroyed. liz: you look at berkshire hathaway which owns geico, some of these will see payoffs. you make a very interesting point in that is this was not necessarily a wind event, it was a storm surge event. most of that is covered by government storm insurance. if we look at the most expensive storms, could this be worse than the isaacs and hurricane andrew >> in public opinion, it is not always clear what really caused the damage. people fight with their insurers for years. as a practical matter, the biggest flood risk and storm surge risk will come not from personal customers, but rather from commercial concerns. not that there is anyone who looks at this and says it will not be a manageable
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5